Incomplete

Incomplete: not having all the necessary or appropriate parts; not full or finished.

Yep, Merriam-Webster’s definition aptly describes this past year.  Fall 2011 I took an incomplete for my 19th century poetry class, and Spring 2012 I had to take another incomplete for my African 901 course.  That time it was due to missing a month of school during the time I had mono.  All things come in threes, right?  Well, it’s true in this case.  My third incomplete came when I returned to Wisconsin early from Florida to attend Grandpa’s funeral.

Thankfully, incompletes are not final grades and they don’t stay on your transcript forever.  An incomplete, when given in the academic world, is a very tangible expression of a professor’s humanity and shows that s/he has a heart.  When s/he extends this lifeline of mercy, the student has extra time to complete missed coursework, exams and/or final papers.  And I must admit that I have great professors who have been more than willing to work with me.  They’ve been quite sympathetic to the varying situations that have prevented me from completing my work by the end of the semester.  I will always be grateful for their kindness.

The other good news is that I finished the work for African 901 and my Wolof course at the University of Florida last week.  And guess what?  I earned the grades that I wanted.  It took me longer than I originally planned – and it hung over my head during Christmas break and my whole summer – but in the end, it worked out fine.  The end result was the same or even better than it would have been if I’d finished everything by the dates set arbitrarily by the University.

Why is this such a big deal?  Well, up until this year I’d always seen incompletes as taboo or as a red flag that signaled to my professors that I wasn’t a very good graduate student.  Thankfully I’ve learned that incompletes aren’t necessarily bad things.  In fact, they’re a way of granting extra time to learn, accomplish or finish something that is important.

I have to admit, though, that while I was working through this series of incompletes I  became frustrated with the situation and myself.  I just wanted to be done and move on to the next part of life or my next project, not having to divide my attention between too many things.  However now that the whole ordeal is over, I have seen parallels between this academic experience and regular life.  For example, when I set goals it doesn’t take my brain very long to go through a myriad of situations that relate to how I’m going to accomplish the goal, how much time I need to spend doing certain things, people I need to talk to, individuals that I need to read into my project, the cons of said goal or project, etc etc. And then, once I’ve decided that it’s really worth my time and effort, I really zero-in on the end result and I make it happen.  Of course I’m not alone in my efforts, and I’m grateful to those who open up doors in my behalf and who support me in my endeavors.

Having said that, I  must also say that I’m quite linear in my process of getting from Point A to Point B.  I’m driven, almost to a fault.  Usually hiccups and detours don’t bother me very much, and I feel that I’m pretty good at adapting to changes in my plans.  But sometimes when life takes a different turn than I have anticipated, it can be hard to “take an incomplete” and wait or continue working until the timing is more auspicious for the realization of what I had envisioned.

I think we all go through things like that.  Wanting and working to make a career change or earning a degree; dating, finding a good spouse and creating a meaningful marriage; having and raising children; moving to the house or city of your dreams; taking that trip around the world; overcoming a bad habit, etc, etc.  At times we set arbitrary deadlines for these goals and when that deadline rolls around, we’re disappointed in ourselves for not having accomplished our goal.

Why do we do that?  I have no idea.  But we do.  We forget to find joy in the journey and we lose our perspective.  This whole discussion fits right in with one of my previous blog posts, especially since the same conclusion that I made there applies here.  Thankfully it’s been reaffirmed to my mind and heart this past week…

We have to remember that Heavenly Father is in charge and that He has our best interests in mind.  He’s the Master Planner.  He sees the end from the beginning, and He knows what needs to happen in our lives in order for us to find lasting happiness.  He wants us to plan, set goals, and work to see their fruition.  He also wants us to include Him in our plans.  There will be moments when He says, “Slow down, take an incomplete for a little while.  There’s something else that you need to learn and experience before you can fully appreciate the first goal you have.  This time will give you an opportunity to see other alternatives that lead to better results than what you’ve already planned.  Yes, it will take you longer than you previously thought, but that’s ok.  Doubt not, fear not.  You’ll be happy with the end result.”

In the grand scheme of things, incompletes aren’t something to be ashamed of or something to despise.  They’re blessings, something that I call tender mercies, sent from a loving Father in Heaven who knows and loves us.  If we choose to remain happy and full of faith, incompletes turn out to make life more complete.

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