It’s after midnight here in Dakar so that means that technically, I fly home to the United States in two days.  Yep, two days from now I’ll be back in Madison, hugging my dad (and probably crying), eating some really yummy food, and sleeping in my bed for the first time in 10 months.  And the day after my mom will be flying home from Utah and the hugging and crying will start all over again.  We’re criers in our family.  But they’ll be good tears.

While I am profoundly grateful for the experiences I’ve had, the people I’ve met, the places I’ve visited and the things that I have learned, I am absolutely thrilled and even more grateful to be going home.

My first two weeks will be a whirlwind of activities, including finalizing things for my new apartment, getting things settled with my car, going through belongings to see what things I can get rid of, seeing my extended family over the Fourth of July weekend, and moving into said new apartment.  And from the minute I step off of that plane at O’Hare – wait, probably from the time I board the plane in Dakar – I will get questions like, “Why did you go to Senegal?”  “Why did you choose that particular topic when you could have chosen so many more positive things to write your dissertation on?”  “Why Africa?”  Those are all  good, valid questions.  But more often than not, I’ll also get the more banal, humdrum, run-of-the-mill, barely-scratch-the surface questions like “What was your favorite thing/place/person you saw/visited/met in Senegal?”  “Do the Senegalese have TVs and drive cars?” “What’s the food like?”  “How was the weather?” And my all-time favorite: “In three or four sentences, tell us about the highlights of your trip.”

HUH??  As Genie says in Aladdin, “What?  Doth my ears deceive me??”  I just spent 10 months over there and you want me to distill all of the sights, smells, tastes, people, joys, frustrations, things-I-wish-I-did-differently moments, cultural adjustments, soul-searching, fear, bewilderment, helplessness, empowerment and happiness I experienced into 3 or 4 sentences?  You’re nuts!  (And evidently, so I am I because I just quoted a line from a 21 year-old Disney film in an otherwise very somber, intellectual post.  Seriously, guys, I haven’t watched that movie in at least 15 years.  But that’s beside the point).

I know that these types of questions are coming because those are the exact same questions people asked me when I came back from my other two residencies abroad… except for the TVs and cars one…  And in all fairness, those types of questions aren’t an affront to me or what I study.  The people who ask them have good intentions, and they’re trying to express interest in what I do and understand what makes me and my research tick.  So I can’t get miffed about it.  And usually I don’t.  Because I understand.  I’ve asked those stupid questions myself in the past, even when I knew better.  But they’re not the best kind of questions that one should ask another person who has dedicated the last however many months or years to a single topic/area of expertise and who will continue to dedicate – or at least be heavily interested and involved with it – for the rest of his or her life.

So what types of questions should be asked by others – including by the one who had the experience (aka – during moments of self-reflection and pondering)?  Well, in essence, the ones that you have to think about in order to formulate and the ones that become springboards to substantial elaboration.  Here are a few off the top of my head:

  • What are some of the most important things you learned during your time abroad?
  • What aspect of their culture touched your heart the most?  Why?
  • What do you appreciate the most about those people/cultures/experiences and why?
  • How has this time made you a better person?
  • How are you going to take what you have learned and make a difference in your life and the lives of the people you will touch in the future?
  • What would you want someone like me to understand about x, y, or z?
  • What were the things you experienced over there make you more grateful for your upbringing/cultural heritage/family/job/blessings?
  • Are there any people/places/things (yes, that is the definition of a noun) that you hope to never take for granted again and why?
  • How have you changed for the better?
  • What did you do when times got tough and you wanted to throw in the towel?  What kept you going?
  • How did you see the hand of God directing you or the people you worked with?

Those are hard questions, and your friend may have a little difficulty answering them.  Or at least putting all of those feelings into words for the first time.  But those are the ones that really show interest, and more often than not, those are the questions that s/he wants you to ask because their answers will embody the complexity of the most important aspects of their experience.  Some of those questions are quite personal and depending on how well you know him/her, they might be inappropriate for you to ask.  However, those questions will get him/her thinking and will help that individual identify and process the richness and uniqueness of their experiences.  If they can’t share them with you, at least you’ve helped them put feelings and heart beats into words.

So by all means, when you see me, ask me those questions.  As soon as I stepped off the plane into the stifling humidity that envelops Dakar in September, I’ve been asking myself those exact questions, trying to wade through some of the answers and trying to formulate them into one cohesive whole.  It’s hard because they’re multi-faceted and don’t lend well to quick, off-the-cuff conversations.

A lot of you ask me why I don’t write more specifically about the things I’m researching and seeing with the children.  Well, there are several reasons.  First, some of the things I’ve experienced here are so completely unbelievable that if I hadn’t seen them myself, I’d question my honesty as I reported them.  Second, you have no idea how much suffering these people go through, nor can you readily identify with how happy most of them remain throughout their horrendous difficulties.  You have to see it and experience it for yourself.  Most of us Westerners really need to suck it up, stop whining, and look for the blessings in our lives.  Because we flip out if we can’t get the smartphone we want or go on that trip we’ve been looking forward to, etc.  We think our life is “over” if we have to go without this or that or don’t do this or that.  Give me a break, guys.  These people are pretty down far the ladder in terms of material wealth and bodily health, and yet their smiles are some of the biggest and brightest I have ever seen, and their laughs have more life and sincerity than the majority of ours.  And yes, I am chastising myself just as much as I’m chastising you.  Because I flip out unnecessarily, too.

Third, a lot of what I’ve been doing will turn into intellectual property and play major roles in my dissertation and future publications.  So it isn’t necessarily in my best academic or professional interest to have them plastered on the internet for others to take and use for their own purposes without being able to control how they’re used.  Fourth, and most importantly, I have seen and experienced things that are so terrible and evil… that I don’t think I will ever be able to talk about them – and if by some miracle I do, it will be several years down the road.

But I can tell you the following.

I am proud and humbled to be an American.  I love my country, I love my freedoms, and I hate seeing them being stripped away by people who think we need to be more like other countries and other cultures.  I will not apologize for or be ashamed of what we hold dear, nor will I bow down to what other people think we should do/be or not do/be.  Because I have seen what such actions can do to a whole society.  And Senegal is a model in West Africa and the surrounding area.  The Senegalese have it good compared to other countries.  Think about that one for a while.  Are they good people?  Do they have things to offer me and others as far as values and the way they treat others?  Do they have just as much inherent potential and value as you or me?  By and large, have I enjoyed my experience with them?  To all of these questions, I respond, by all means YES!  But I cannot tell you how much my heart swells with gratitude when I see my flag and think of the myriad of things it symbolizes.

Similarly, we all need to be careful of smooth talkers – no matter what profession they practice, no matter what social class they belong to, no matter what religion they adhere to, no matter how beautiful or popular or rich they are.  Because they do not always have our best interest at heart.  This is true in politics, and this is especially true in leader/follower or mentor/mentoree relationships.  In my current context, I have seen this time and time again as families entrust the care of their young children to individuals who they think are good men.  But they turn out to be the worst kind of charlatans and do unspeakable things to children who range from the age where they just barely cut their teeth to the late teens and early 20s.  Things are not always as they seem, and we owe it to ourselves and our loved ones to study it out from every different angle possible, and especially to not fall into traps that so often come with the proverbial bandwagon.  We do not have to be like everyone else.  We do not have to keep up with the Jonses (sorry, Dan and Darla!).

Families are the most important thing that you and I have, and they are society’s most important unit.  Nothing can replace loving parents who honor their marital commitments and strive to raise their children in kindness, with soft voices and warm hands, and with the purest of love.  Parents, don’t get sucked into the media and money-crazed world that we live in.  Put the phone, laptop, iPad down (or anything that is similar metaphorically) and pay attention to that little voice who is asking for your attention or to the little hand resting on your knee in the hopes that you will pick him/her up and hug him/her close.  The phone will be there when you get back.  So will the computer or the TV or that book or that project you’re working on.  Stop allowing yourself to be distracted by the things that matter the least and ignoring the people that mean the most.  I have always been very sensitive to the needs and actions of little children – and if anything, these last 10 months have made me even more so.  Play with them, speak gently to them, hug them, kiss them.  Remember that when they’re little they’re still learning – don’t develop unrealistic expectations for a young child that s/he cannot achieve.  If you do, you’re setting both you and him/her up for heartache and disappointment, and the little one will learn to fear you and not trust you.   Help your kids know and understand by your words – and most importantly – your actions that they are loved and that no matter what happens in the world or what stupid (or serious) mistake they make that you will always, always, always love them.  Don’t let your bad mood dictate how you treat them – it’s your problem, not theirs.  Because they will remember it, and their little spirits will break.

Remember that the relationship you have with your spouse affects them in ways that you can’t even fathom.  So if you and your spouse aren’t doing so great, love yourself, him/her and especially your child enough to evaluate where you went off track.  Stop getting mad over stupid stuff.  Stop yelling.  Stop arguing.  Be adults and learn to work out your differences like adults.  The other person isn’t entirely at fault.  You share part of the blame.  So stop deluding yourself into thinking otherwise.  Of course there are situations where splitting up and divorcing is inevitable and the best solution in the end.  But by and large, your problems can be fixed fairly easily.  So be a man (or woman as your situation dictates) and suck it up.  Stop being so selfish.  Because it’s not just you who is unhappy.  Your spouse is, too.  And remember that there is a little pair of eyes watching you from around the wall, eyes that are filled with pain, tears, and fear because you are his/her world.  And if your world falls apart due to ridiculous reasons, so will his/hers.  I don’t care how old the child is – even if s/he is an adult.  I promise you that they will have the harder end of the deal than you.

I realize that these are harsh words.  Most of you know that I have no tolerance for those kind of things.  But as one who has seen to the bottom of the cesspool, please realize that I only have your best interests (and those of children) in mind when I say what I say.  Can children and child-rearing be difficult?  Yes, of course.  Don’t think for one minute that I don’t recognize this or that I haven’t experienced it just because I’m not yet a mother.  But remember that your child can test your patience, love, and metal without you reacting or retaliating in a way that is unbecoming of their parent, the person that should love them unconditionally.  They don’t force you to react one way or the other.  They have no control over your reaction.  You chose how you will respond.  Not them.

Cherish your families and treat them accordingly. Live so you won’t have any regrets if you don’t wake up tomorrow.  Live so your children know, see, and understand that they are loved.

Lastly, God lives and He is good.  Despite of what I have seen and experienced lately (and even in my past), I know that He is aware of us as individuals and that He cares very much about what we are all going through.  I’ve heard the following expression over and over since my arrival in Senegal: “God?  What God?  How can He see this suffering and not do anything about it?  If God exists, He must be dead.”

God is not dead.  He is always reaching out to us, always willing to relieve our pain, always willing to enfold us in His arms of love.  But just like any other relationship, we must put forth the effort to know Him and embrace His goodness.  How can He help us if we give into despair and refuse to find the good in the world and people that surround us?  How can He help us if we have adopted a fatalistic attitude?

He can’t.

Let us be better friends and disciples, let us seek for and fight for the good.  And we will find that He is and always has been right by our side.

There is always hope.  There is always light at the end of His tunnel – we just have to choose not to dynamite the cavern and block our path to what lies ahead.

So in a nutshell, that’s what Senegal and studying/working with victims of child trafficking have taught me.  There’s certainly a lot more, but in essence, my time here has helped push aside the fluff and focus on what’s important.

I pray that I may keep this perspective uncluttered and move forward with faith, hope, the determination to work hard, and the courage to love when it is difficult to do so.


Tambacounda and the Imams

We had a meeting with approximately 30 imams and maîtres coranique Thursday morning and afternoon at the regional government seat in Tambacounda.  Since 99.9% of the imams don’t speak French, these meetings are always conducted in Wolof.  So that gives me lots of listening comprehension practice, and from time to time my colleagues also get to hone their live translation techniques.  Imam Ousman Samb presented verses from the Koran and various hadiths that talk about the responsibility of parents and adults towards children, violence (in and out of the family unit), begging, and the safety of children.  UNICEF and PARRER commissioned him to work on a document in French and Wolof on those same subject that they, along with the Senegalese Ministry of the Family, just published last year and he used a lot of that in his presentation.  Since we’re asking imams around the country to address the dangers associated with child begging, he also prepared a model sermon that they can use in their meetings should they chose to do so.

Something that I still have a little trouble understanding is the shock that crosses their faces when we tell them that when parents confer their sons to itinerant marabouts – many of whom end up taking them from their villages located throughout Senegal and moving them to Dakar – the children end up spending the grand majority of their time on the street rather than learning to recite the Koran.  Instead, many become victims of various forms of violence and pedophilia.  Many imams, even those in Dakar, don’t believe that when we tell them.  It’s such a well documented fact that it’s hard for me to wrap my mind around the fact that they’re not aware of it.  Their ignorance (and I don’t mean that in a negative sense) stems from the fact that many do not have access to the internet, it’s rarely brought up in all its horrors on national TV, and newspaper stories are superficial at best.  In fact I’m not at all impressed with the press here.  But that’s a story for a different time.  The statistics come from Western organizations and while the government is aware of the issue, the strong influence that religion has in politics causes people to skirt around it.  You know the expression “the elephant in the room”?  Yeah, well this is an ENORMOUS elephant, the granddaddy of them all, and no one has had enough courage to effectively enforce child trafficking laws that they ratified back in 2005.  (I’ve written several academic papers on this aspect, so while I’m not citing references here I will gladly do so if people would like to read up on the subject).  Another reason why disbelief runs rampant is that a generation or two ago, those ills weren’t associated with Koranic education in any way, shape, or form.  So today’s imams only have their effective, and in many cases holistic, perspective and experiences to draw upon.  It doesn’t even enter their mind that something like child rape, the heavy usage of illicit drugs, etc occurs.  A sad commentary on our times.  Oh, how the world has changed.

So their first reaction to our presentation is resistance – many of them think that we’re fighting against Islamic tradition, specifically that of teaching young boys to memorize the Koran.  But we’re not.  We’re asking that since anyone can proclaim themselves to be a Koranic teacher, that, as well-respected individuals in the community, they as imams effectively caution parents to be wary of men who masquerade as Koranic teachers.  The second most common thing they say is that federal funds need to be set aside for Koranic schools, not just for the French system (again, that is another topic for another day), and that it’s the government’s job to hold those men accountable and convict them in courts of law.  And they’re right.  The government absolutely needs to step up to the plate and stop cowering behind the status quo and the way things used to be.  But these imams often forget that they have a role to play, too.  And quite frankly, so do parents.  And our team is working with all three parties.  A third thing that often comes up in these meetings is denial.  “Oh, that doesn’t happen in our daaras (Koranic schools).  Our talibés (students) are happy and aren’t mistreated at all.”  It has always surprised me that my superiors and the big-wig imams who are working on this project don’t call those individuals out on the carpet.  Because it does, and they are.  And there are scores of documentation in the offices of various local and international NGOs that prove it, not to mention those of the United States Departments of State and Labor and the United Nations.  Maybe it’s my hard-nosed, stubborn, in-your-face streak that gets my dander up because I would have absolutely no problem calling their bluff and calling a spade a spade.  Stuff like that ticks me off and I don’t have any tolerance for it whatsoever.

So you can imagine how hard it was to fight my urge to stand up and clap when one NGO leader that works in this region did what I’ve been wanting to do ever since I arrived in this country.  One imam fed us the line about how well their daaras are run and this guy looked him straight in the eye, pointed his finger at the imam and effectively said, “That’s not true and you know it.”  And he went on to say that on December 31st (just last week) he met a young talibé who had fled his daara because of the abuse to which he had been subjected.  The director took compassion on the boy and he took him into his own house and he’s staying there until arrangements can be made to send him back to his parents.  You should have seen everyone’s faces.  They’d been called out and they were totally feeling guilty.  We got a lot further with them after that.

Side note: I’m so grateful for the organization of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and all of the planning, intellectual and financial efforts, standardization of teaching materials, and training that our general leaders invest in making sure that the doctrine remains pure.  I’m also grateful that individuals who grossly stray from it are held accountable.  So many problems that are tied to this child begging issue could have been avoided had efforts been made to ensure that their practices (Islam in general and Sufi Islam specifically) are the same across the board.  Other cultural practices add to the problem, but by and large it goes back to religious doctrinal standardization and accountability.

After our meetings one of the more receptive imams took us to the homes of three other imams so we could meet with them and ask them for their support.  Evidently they hold a lot of religious and political clout, but due to their age, they weren’t able to come to our meeting.  It was very interesting to be in their homes.  They were in some of the poorer areas of town, they were quite simple, and they were often surrounded by family and neighbors who had lots of little children.  We had to take our shoes off before entering the sitting room, the women didn’t speak other than giving the customary greetings, so the whole affair was done between men.  I noticed that out of respect to the imam, no one looked him directly in the eye (except for me before I realized what was going on – it kind of unnerved the first one we met with).  The conversation was spoken in either Wolof or Pulaar and no one except for the oldest member of our group spoke to him directly.  It was all done by a spokesman.  When the imam wanted to tell us something, he told the spokesman and then the spokesman relayed it on to us.  At the end the imam prayed for us and the success of our mission.  Later Bamba told me that all three of them said that they would address the issue that night at the Friday night prayer.  That’s a big deal because the Friday prayers are the most important of the week.  At dinner Imam Ousman Samb, the big-wig imam ratib from Dakar who is part of our team, told me that the third imam that we visited said a beautiful prayer over us before we left his house.  It was a very long prayer – that’s basically all I got from it – but Imam Samb said that the language he used was quite beautiful.  Evidently that imam is considered as one who has devoted his life to God so completely that he has achieved the status of one who “sees and knows hidden things.”

In the course of 90 minutes of silent observation I learned scores of things about the cultural and religious customs of Senegal – very interesting stuff.

Everyone was exceptionally pleased during our car ride back to the hotel because all three of them agreed to help us and encourage the imams he presides over to read the materials we created and address the issue in their sermons.  So it was a good day and quite effective.  Here’s hoping that our efforts and training aren’t abandoned and left by the wayside.


Sociologist Mamadou Wade, the imam, the spokesman


Bamba (in the olive colored robe) giving the imam the materials addressing child begging

So… WHY are you going to Senegal?

I get this question a lot.  It boils down to three things:

  1. As an Africanist (focusing on French-speaking Africa) I have to have spent a significant amount of time on the continent in order to be respected in my field.
  2. Of all the Francophone African literature I have studied and researched, Senegalese literature and expression interests me the most.  I’ve also had a few occasions to meet highly-acclaimed Senegalese authors and I feel a larger connection to their novels/poems than with work that other authors have produced.
  3. Thanks to the mentoring and connections of some of my professors, I have more professional and literary contacts in Senegal who are in a position to help further my educational and professional pursuits.

In fact, the research and volunteer work that I will be conducting in Senegal concerning human trafficking – child begging in particular – can be found in the current events of several African countries and their literature.  So in actuality, my research is interdisciplinary and transnational.

The general topic of my dissertation will be family and child dynamics in French and Francophone literatures; I will specifically highlight child exploitation and trafficking in 19th century French novels and Francophone novels particular to West and Central African regions.  I will delve into more details about human trafficking and child exploitation in Senegal in subsequent posts.  So don’t fear, I’ll continue to share the generalities of my work, and, when I am able to do so, I will delve into the specifics of the Senegalese situation.  If you have specific questions, please let me know and I’ll make an effort to address them in future posts.

Until then, I thought that I would share the main essay that I wrote for the Boren Fellowship. It paints a good picture of what I will be focusing on during my 10-month stay in Dakar.  Please recognize first that the Boren Fellowship is given to scholars whose research relates to American national security.  The Boren Fellowship is funded by the government, so the research has to be valuable for the United States government on a national and global scale.  That is why those individuals who receive the Boren are required to work for the US government for a minimum of one year after the conferral of their degree.  Second, this is a very general overview of the plight of these boys and the length of the essay was constrained by a word-count specified by the Boren committee.  The situation includes many facets and it is quite complicated… which is one reason why Boren saw fit to award me the fellowship.

Since September 11th and the spread of terrorism throughout the world, the American government has taken a greater interest in Africa.  Together with the United States African Command, national security agencies monitor possible Islamic threats and the political instability of various African nations which may prove dangerous to the American people.  Historically, Senegal has been a fairly secure country.  However, with the recent presence of terrorist cells in its bordering countries and a rise in violations of Senegalese Islamic customs, Senegal is becoming more unstable and compounds the perils that face the United States.

This is due, in part, to an increase in the exploitation of Senegalese children.  In the Islamic Senegalese culture, many parents temporarily transfer guardianship of their young boys to a ‘marabout’ – a Koranic teacher – expecting that the children will study the Koran and the Islamic faith.  Because alms-giving is one of the 5 pillars of Islam, and adherence to this practice is such an expectation, the marabouts are able to avoid the obligation of feeding their students – known as ‘talibés’ – by requiring them to beg on the streets for their meals.

Over the past two decades some marabouts have transformed their schools into human trafficking rings.  The children are sent out to beg all day and upon their return, they must surrender the money to the marabouts without receiving adequate food, shelter, and education for their own well-being.  Consequently, the boys are placed in continual risk of becoming subject to drugs, violence, and sexual exploitation.  Additionally, Senegal’s geographic location facilitates the quick, illegal transportation of these boys to other parts of Africa and Europe.  Failure to publicize, educate, and then change these practices will continue to erode the stability of Senegal, and increase poverty and the occurrences of crimes against children.  Failure to check this problem by the United States and other countries who fundamentally despise such practices will undoubtedly increase the number of young, uneducated boys becoming attracted, or sent, to extremist Muslim circles that are currently located in the West African region.  These groups seek to threaten the physical safety of the citizens of the United States and other nations of the world.

The United States Department of Labor (USDOL) and the Bureau of International Labor Affairs (BILA) identify Senegal as a hub for child trafficking rings.  Senegal is both a trafficking transit country and/or destination for bordering countries, and a source of objects of sexual exploitation for Europe.  According to studies conducted by the USDOL and the BILA, the talibes are by far the most common trafficking victims; furthermore, a UNICEF report published in 2007 states that the boys range from ages two to fifteen.  All three agencies confirm that boys who are forced into this servitude spend their days begging in the streets, suffer the rages of various illnesses, and are the subjects of extreme acts of violence.  Talibés in southern Senegal live near known insurgent groups who, according to the CIA World Factbook, launch violent attacks upon neighboring villages.  Similarly, talibés who live on or near the borders of Mauritania and Mali have a high potential of exposure to militant Muslim extremists, including al-Qaeda adherents.  Many boys are transported to other African countries that harbor terrorist cells and are hostile to American interests.

In the past, USAID, the United Nations Children’s Fund, the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank, UNICEF, and several foreign governments have joined forces with the Senegalese government to combat the social and political consequences associated with the mistreatment of the talibes.  These partnerships have focused on educating the general public about the boys’ plight.  Thanks to their efforts, Senegal has seen somewhat of a decline in child exploitation, yet the problem persists.  Within the last ten years, several NGOs have been created to broaden general awareness of this horrible reality and to root out corrupt marabouts.  They have endeavored to either return the boys to their families or to relocate them to legitimate schools.

One such Senegalese NGO, the Partenariat Pour le Retrait et la Réinsertion des Enfants de la Rue (PARRER), was established in 2007.  It is governed by an assembly of national Islamic leaders, private sector professionals, and former Senegalese government officials.  PARRER is one of the few Senegalese NGOs that comprehensively addresses the situation surrounding the talibés.  In addition to the activities mentioned above, it also seeks to educate poorer families living in the rural areas of the country which are most likely to entrust the care of their children to corrupt marabouts.  PARRER also aids the government in implementing educational standards in Senegal’s Koranic schools and in eliminating child begging from the Koranic curriculum.

With the help of Boren Fellowship funds, I plan to intern at PARRER in Dakar.  Doing so would complement my research interests concerning the portrayal of the Senegalese family in contemporary fiction and current events.

Several literary works address the talibés’ situation.  In 1961 Cheikh Hamidou Kane, founder and president of PARRER, published a semi-autobiographical novel entitled L’aventure ambiguë, in which he describes the life of a young talibé and the hardships he endured during his years at school.  Today the novel is one of the most revered literary works in all of Francophone Africa.  Thanks to his literary work and his efforts as a former minister of the Senegalese government, Kane is a national hero.  He and I also maintain an academic relationship.  Working at PARRER will give me the opportunity of cooperating with Kane, and will afford firsthand perspectives which will allow me to communicate authoritatively about issues facing Senegalese children.  Since Senegal is a small, impoverished country where only the educated elite use French, proficiency in Wolof is essential to be able to converse with exploited boys and their families.  Overcoming language barriers fosters trust and it enables the voices of the talibés to be heard both domestically and internationally.

Children are the future, and families are the basic units of any society.  If children continue to be victimized and trafficked to dangerous individuals who have no respect for the life and happiness of others, then eventually our families, societies, and nations will crumble.  As a future literary critic who will be familiar with Islamic practices and the plight of the talibés, I will be able to contextualize works that examine the social impact of practices that threaten children and families in Senegal.  Working as a Boren Fellow in Africa will yield unique perspectives that will prove beneficial to several entities within the federal government, especially to the Department of State and several embassies.  I hope fulfill my service requirement as an area studies specialist in either the Civil Service division or the Office of the Under Secretary for Global Affairs.

So there you have it – my winning essay.  This past semester (Jan-May 2012) I had the opportunity to research the religious reasonings behind the practice of child begging, and I presented that research at an international conference held at UW-Madison April 26-28, 2012, and I am working to get that paper published.  I will post more about that conference and paper in the future.

And last but not least, I cannot end this post without thanking my sister, Amber, for spending hours editing my essays (yes, there were a couple more) and giving me very insightful and pertinent information that I could use in my essays.  Thanks to Professors Chantal Thompson, Steven Winspur and Aliko Songolo for your invaluable help and feedback.  And last but not least, thank you to Angela Albretson, Margaret Merrill, and Matt Dinger for looking over my drafts for clarity and errors before I submitted my proposal.  I wouldn’t be where I am today without all of your help!